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Humour in Marketing is Risky: here are 4 Aussie attempts

Humour in Marketing is Risky: here are 4 Aussie attempts

Marketers, ever on the lookout for unique ways to make an impact, sometimes attempt to including humour in marketing campaigns. Sometimes it works well. Other times…not so much. Here are four examples where marketers have tried to bring the funny – you be the judge! Humour in marketing – don’t get burnt! The Perth suburb of Cockburn might be pronounced ‘Coburn’, but a local aquatic centre used the way it’s spelt to create a sunscreen awareness sign that said, “It’s not called Cockburn for nothing”. While some people were not amused, others saw it as a clever way to draw attention to an important issue. Certainly demonstrates that your message can hit home, or not – depending on who’s listening! Daylight robbery When robbers broke into Ksubi’s New York store and stole $4,000 worth of clothing, the brand used an image of their getaway with the slogan “These guys robbed us last week but they were a week early….. Run Now” to promote their upcoming sale. Shows they have a sense of humour about the robbery. On the other hand, it could show their approach to being robbed is a bit too laid back – depending on how you look at it. Going too far? Brisbane brand YP Threads sent out emails to users saying it had ‘incriminating’ photos of them which they would publish unless they bought certain items.   In the age of online hoaxes and fraud schemes, this probably wasn’t the best idea! The backlash led to the brand’s founder calling it a “bad judgement call” and apologising. Despite all that however, it appears the campaign...
How to Create a Brand Communications Style Guide

How to Create a Brand Communications Style Guide

It is time to create a brand communications style guide for your company? When you want to create a strong brand identity, build trust with your customers and make sure your brand is instantly recognisable, consistency is the key. This is easy enough to achieve if you’re a one-person operation, but when you have multiple individuals or design and content agencies working on projects for your company,  a brand communications style guide can become essential. A style guide lays out a clear framework for your communications, from the layout and font to the style and tone of the language used. A style guide can help you maintain a sense of consistency in your visual and written communications. A clear set of guidelines also makes it much easier for your writers and designers to do their job properly, resulting in better quality content, more recognisable brand values and a uniform message across different platforms. 7 things every brand communications style guide needs The idea behind a style guide is that it is as concise as possible – the easier it is to use, the more likely your team will refer to it rather than guesstimate what to do. While the details will vary depending on your brand, your style guide should include the following seven things as a minimum: Introduction: Always start with a clear introduction explaining the purpose of your style guide. Have headings for each section and include a contents page so people can find things quickly. Basic overview of writing guidelines: It might sound like a no-brainer but you’ll need to specify the basics like whether you’re using...
7 Tips for Thought Leadership Writing

7 Tips for Thought Leadership Writing

Are you aiming to write articles or blog posts that demonstrate thought leadership? It’s becoming a popular strategy for professionals, consultants and business owners, to increase visibility, build credibility, increase connections and even generate high level leads. But thought leadership writing isn’t as easy as it sounds, as you might have already discovered. The following 7 tips briefly cover some of the topics included in our recently launched Thought Leadership Writing Course for professionals, consultants and business owners. It’s the thought that counts – don’t forget to include yours   The term ‘thought leadership’ defines itself, but I’ve recently created my own definition: Thought leaders are individuals who are forward-thinking experts in their field, who by sharing their views and perspectives, have the capacity to change the way we see something. To be a thought leader means you must stand out from the crowd of topic experts, by having a unique perspective, or be sharing something of greater value than most ‘experts’ are sharing. That means you won’t be simply repeating other people’s ideas. It means you’re not locked on the current way of doing things in your role or industry. You want to improve the way things are done.  And you have an eye to the future. How are things changing? How might we be doing things in 5 years or 10 years from now? What changes or trends could impact our industry or the way we do things? How can we prepare for that? Back up your thoughts with facts – real ones     For some topics, your personal experience and some compelling logic might suffice...
Should your business be ‘capturing leads’?

Should your business be ‘capturing leads’?

If you’re a service based business without any means of lead capture on your website, then you’re probably allowing many prospective clients to slip away. Perhaps you’ve come across the term ‘lead capture’ while reading up on content marketing, but aren’t quite sure what sort of difference it would make to your business, or how you would implement it. Let’s take a look at what lead capture is, what the benefits are, and what’s involved in doing it. What is lead capture? Lead capture is the practice of inviting website visitors to register their details in order to receive content and/or further communication from you. In the simplest form, lead capture is that ‘subscribe to our newsletter’ or ‘subscribe for updates’ option you see on many sites. However, unless your content writers turning out  highly unique material and you have droves of people wanting to sign up, this doesn’t go far enough. One reason this isn’t sufficient for most service businesses, is that not all their prospective clients have precisely the same interests, challenges, pain points and buying motivations. Unless you’re able to segment your database into buyer types, and deliver the most relevant content to each, results with a newsletter subscription alone are likely to be mediocre. Another issue is in the timing. When someone subscribes to your blog or newsletter, that action doesn’t indicate what they’re interested in right now, or how you might help them. However, if they download an eBook related to a specific challenge, it’s a different story. What you have then is often a genuine lead – someone who has identified themselves as a...
Australianising US Content: a guide for AU marketing managers

Australianising US Content: a guide for AU marketing managers

It’s a common challenge. The content team at US headquarters pumps out volumes of great content, and the US or global marketing director doesn’t understand why you want to engage an Australian content agency to create localised content. Can’t you just tweak it? Maybe, you reply cautiously. Some pieces of content can be easily touched up for an Australian audience. Other pieces will have so many issues you don’t know where to begin – or how to explain the problem to someone who might not understand how delightfully different we are Down Under. Aside from the Australian English versus American English issue, there are other factors that come into play, like differences in buyer motivation, cultural attitudes and the suitability of examples used in American content. Here’s a handy guide to help you identify the issues involved, or perhaps to more easily explain the scale of the content localisation problem to US HQ! How are we different? Let us count the ways: Spelling – American English vs Australian English Back in the 18th century, English spelling was somewhat inconsistent. Two influential chaps decided to put an end to that, and each published a dictionary. Unfortunately, they were different. The English began to favour one dictionary, but Americans favored the other, so now we have inconsistency on a global scale. Australia followed the English, as we often do. A few examples: OUR (AU) versus OR (US): Our Aussie humour can be a little colourful. We’re sure American humor can be colorful too, even if we don’t find all of it funny. ISE (AU) versus IZE (US): That wouldn’t stop Australians...
8 Digital Marketing Courses Business Owners Can Take for Free

8 Digital Marketing Courses Business Owners Can Take for Free

Calling all business owners who are tired of banging their heads against brick walls due to average digital marketing results. Sound like you? As every business owner knows, sometimes, if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself…at least until you find (or can afford) an exceptionally competent person to take it over. For many businesses, budgets simply don’t allow for outsourcing everything to a digital marketing professional or a content marketing agency. There might be no choice but to dabble in some DIY marketing strategies. The problem is, when we do attempt our own SEO or Pay Per Click (PPC) tweaking, we often don’t know enough to get the results we’d like. And as they say, a little knowledge can be dangerous! If you’ve been experimenting with your own digital marketing like a nutty cyber professor, and your results have been… well…blah…it might be time to think bigger. Here’s a list of 8 free courses and resources available to amplify your DIY marketing prowess. All of these can be done online in your own time. Take your time and investigate them all, or click the link on the list below to jump to the course of most interest. SEO training with Moz Adwords & Digital Marketing training by Google WordStream PPC University Inbound Marketing – HubSpot training Open Universities Australia – Online Advertising GFC Learn Free – Social Media Marketing Canva Tutorials – create fabulous images Wistia Video Tutorials SEO Training by Moz (facilitated by Udemy) Had a crack at your own SEO before? Or do you simply need to wade through the basics because...