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How to transition your team to remote working

How to transition your team to remote working

The Coronavirus outbreak in Australia will impact almost every business in some way in the months ahead. But those with largely office-based employees may be able to continue operating and reduce the risk of employees contracting the virus by allowing employees to work from home. Many companies already have remote working guidelines and a communications structure in place, but others will be completely unprepared for this transition. As a content marketing agency, we’ve always worked from home as everything we do is in the digital environment. So combining our own experience working as a ‘distributed team’, with the expertise of some of our HR, IT and communication connections, we’ve put together this guide to help businesses transition their teams to working from home. There are 8 key things you’ll need to have in place to transition and support remote workers: A work-from-home policy OHS checklist & procedures for home-based workers Computers & related infrastructure Internet access for your workers A means of communication & collaboration Remote IT support A way to manage & monitor productivity A way to stay connected & maintain morale 1. Work from home policy Clare Long, principal consultant at Norgay HR Consulting, says businesses that have existing travel and flexible work policies should be reviewing them with the new and fast evolving coronavirus situation in mind. Those whose employees will be working from home for the first time should develop a policy as a matter of urgency. A work-from-home policy should outline the type of arrangements that can be made, and in what circumstances. It should also mention any limitations or conditions (for example, the...
5 mistakes that prevent freelance writers earning enough

5 mistakes that prevent freelance writers earning enough

The idea of working from home as a freelance writer is very appealing – you get to schedule your day your way, be your own boss, spend more time with family, and so much more. Yet many try to achieve the dream and fail – and head back to the safety of full-time employment all too soon. If you’re stuck in that dilemma now, you should know that it doesn’t have to go that way! Working with freelancers for over 10 years, here’s my take on the 5 mistakes that prevent freelance writers earning enough. 1. Not business networking Nothing comes close to topping ‘word of mouth’ when it comes to getting work. If you think ‘word of mouth’ is limited to people who’ve used your service and tell others, that misperception is probably costing you a fortune. Referrals can come from anywhere, and the best way to start them rolling is by networking. Networking is all about connecting and getting to know people. The more people you connect with, the more people will be able to mention you when someone in a room (or a social media group) asks, “Hey, does anyone know a writer?” But that’s not all – enquiries that come from referrals are much more likely to convert to sales. They’re also less likely to try to haggle over your quote. 2. Under-estimating and under-quoting If you have an ideal hourly rate, under-estimating the time involved in jobs you quote will ensure you don’t earn your goal rate. If you typically charge by word-count, chances are you’re not always getting paid for extra time spent...
How often should you publish on your blog?

How often should you publish on your blog?

One of the questions I’m asked most often by SME owners and marketing managers is: “How often should we publish on our blog?” There’s no one-size-fits-all answer to that question. If you’re just starting out, my advice will normally be: publish one or two articles a month until you’re able to see that your strategy is working, and your articles are reaching and resonating with your audience. On the other hand, if you’ve been publishing articles for some time, but aren’t getting the desired results, I’d recommend reviewing your content strategy before you worry about the number of articles you’re publishing. Some people are surprised when I recommend publishing so few articles. Once the decision is made to start publishing, they want to maximise the result, and are often considering a blog publishing schedule of 8+ articles a month. The problem with this, is that if you’re publishing quality in-depth articles and paying a blog writer or a content marketing agency to create them, that’s a substantial outlay. And it will be wasted if your articles aren’t finding an audience or aren’t resonating well with the desired audience. You can’t maximise the result until you know you’re getting one. The good news is that once you are confident your content is working and contributing to your bottom line, you’ll be able to review your content budget and turn up the dial to increase those results. The key to getting results with a business blog There are two key factors I find are often overlooked by businesses just starting out with their blog. When one or both are missed, the...
Australian Marketing Manager Survey

Australian Marketing Manager Survey

A marketing manager’s role is rarely easy. Are your doing a mountain of work with a small team? Having trouble getting approval for campaigns? We’d like to know about your content-related challenges in 2018. Please take 2 minutes to take our Australian Marketing Manager Survey....
How to Plan and Write a Case Study

How to Plan and Write a Case Study

A content preferences survey in 2017 found that 78% of buyers prefer to use case studies over all other types of content when researching purchases. It’s easy to understand why they are such a valuable content format, but as many marketing managers could attest, the process of planning and writing case studies can be challenging. If you haven’t had to plan and write case studies before, or you’ve found the process challenging, I hope our seven tips below will make the task easier. How to plan and write case studies Click To Tweet What is a case study? A marketing case study is piece of content that showcases a successful project. It typically sets out the commencing situation, the solution recommended by the company creating the case study, how the solution was implemented, implementation actions, along with challenges encountered and how success was achieved. Why do case studies work so well? A case study provides an overview of a positive business transaction with a client. Unlike a testimonial, it’s not just a review or report from a customer who supports your business. It’s a success story. A detailed account of how you were able to successfully solve a problem your client faced. If you are targeting particular industries, writing case studies that resolve challenges unique or highly relevant to those industries, can help you gain the confidence of prospective clients. They’re often a key part of the content strategy for B2B products or services. Case studies can attract new customers, build trust in your business, and make the work of your sales team a bit easier. They also provide...